Reusing Water Wisely

We believe that good stewardship of our water resource includes not only conservation, but water reuse as well.

Upper Trinity Regional Water District does this in two ways:

  • We supply treated effluent (wastewater) from a water reclamation plant for irrigating a local golf course. This is called direct water reuse.

  • We incorporate already-purchased and previously-treated effluent (wastewater) back into our water treatment process. This is called indirect water reuse.

Direct Water Reuse for Irrigation

Upper Trinity Regional Water District (UTRWD) currently contracts with Denton County Fresh Water Supply District #1A to supply up to two million gallons per day of treated effluent (wastewater) for golf course irrigation. Wastewater just treated at the City of Lewisville’s water reclamation plant is pumped to irrigate the Castle Hills golf course in Carrollton. This water source has already proved invaluable during the drought of 1998.

Indirect Water Reuse

Indirect Potable Reuse (IPR) is the blending of advanced treated, recycled or reclaimed water into a natural water source (groundwater basin or reservoir) that could be used for drinking (potable) water after further treatment.

Unlike direct water reuse, indirect potable reuse (IPR) adds another step before water is reused. After the wastewater has been treated, it is put through an environmental “buffer” such as a lake, river, or a groundwater aquifer. This extra step cleans the water further so that it is immediately ready to undergo the regular water treatment process again and then be distributed as quality water that meets all drinking water standards.

UTRWD currently uses indirect reuse at various points in its water system. This practice helps the District to conserve its water resources. It also enables UTRWD to provide water for the lowest possible cost. This makes the District’s services more affordable for everyone.

When it is complete, Lake Ralph Hall will also provide water for indirect potable reuse. The water UTRWD will reuse from Lake Ralph Hall is alone estimated to provide an additional 19 million gallons per day.